WHO's call as COVID-19 rises in Europe

Thứ Bảy, 13/11/2021| 17:01

As COVID-19 flares up again in Europe, the World Health Organization (WHO) on November 12 called for a more targeted COVID-19 vaccine effort to ensure the most vulnerable people worldwide vaccinated.

WHO's call as COVID-19 rises in Europe

Europe, once again at the epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak, recorded nearly 2 million COVID-19 infections last week, the United Nations health agency said. That is the number of COVID-19 cases "the most in a week in the region since the beginning of the pandemic," WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters, according to AFP. As countries work to control the spread by reintroducing restrictive measures against COVID-19 or stepping up COVID-19 vaccination and booster doses, WHO notes it is important to ensure ensuring that the COVID-19 vaccine reaches the right people who need it most in Europe and elsewhere.

It's not just a matter of how many people are vaccinated but also a matter of who gets vaccinated," the WHO leader emphasized. It makes no sense, he noted, to give a booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to healthy adults or vaccinate children while healthcare workers, the elderly and other high-risk groups are on the move. The world is still waiting for the first dose. More and more countries are implementing booster vaccinations for vaccinated populations despite WHO's call to postpone booster vaccinations until the end of the year to free up vaccines for poorer countries. "Every day, six times more boosters are used globally than the main dose in low-income countries," Tedros said, adding that "this is a scandal that must be stopped immediately."  In countries with wide and high vaccination coverage, an increase in COVID-19 cases will not lead to more hospitalizations and deaths from vaccines, said WHO emergencies director Michael Ryan. COVID-19 is effective in protecting against severe illness.

In countries with wide and high vaccination coverage, an increase in COVID-19 cases will not lead to more hospitalizations and deaths from vaccines, said WHO emergencies director Michael Ryan. COVID-19 is effective in protecting against severe illness. However, he warned that even in countries with high general immunization coverage, health systems can quickly come under pressure if vulnerable populations remain unvaccinated. "If you're in Europe right now, where there's a lot of transmission and you're at high risk as a vulnerable group or you're elderly and haven't been vaccinated, it's best to get vaccinated," he said. Michael Ryan pointed out, a recent British study showed that unvaccinated people are 32 times more likely to die in the COVID-19 pandemic than people who have received the COVID-19 vaccine.

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